Texas Health Ben Hogan Sports Medicine

 Injury Home Care

Remember P.R.I.C.E.

PROTECT
Protect the athlete's body part from further injury by taping, bracing, splinting, or immobilizing.

REST
Rest the injured area by discontinuing painful activity or exercise.

ICE
Ice the injured are with an ice bag or cold pack. Apply ice for 15 to 20 minutes every two hours. Continue this for 72 hours (three days), or until the swelling has diminished.

COMPRESSION
Compress the injured area with an elastic wrap from below the injured area towards the heart.

ELEVATE
Elevate the injured area to a level above the heart.

HYDRATE
Drinking plenty of fluids and ingesting extra salt will help the body and prevent heat illness. Eight, 8-ounce glasses of water daily is the best source. When sweating heavily, drink an electrolyte sports drink, and generously add salt to your food. Avoid fluids with high sugar content and carbonation.

Heat Cramps: First sign of heat illness

Treatment:

Heat Exhaustion: Profuse sweating, weakness, dizziness, confusion, fatigue, headache, excessive thirst, nausea, vomiting, and temperature less than 103

Treatment:

Heat Stroke: Hyperthermia, weak rapid pulse, confusion, delayed responses, irregular breathing patterns, and temperature greater than 105

Treatment:

Helpful Phone Numbers

Sports Nutrition
817-250-7512

Sports Massage
817-250-7500 

Sports Psychology
817-250-7512

Sports Therapy
817-250-7500
 

This content is provided for information only and is not intended as medical advice. For advice about your specific medical condition, contact your physician.

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Note: Physicians on the medical staff practice independently and are not employees or agents of the hospital.
Source: impacttest.com, American Academy of Neurology, SCAT


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