Your Upcoming Surgery
What to Expect Before, During and After Surgery
  • Before Your Surgery

    Knowing what to expect before your surgery will help you and your loved ones prepare. In our guides, surgery checklist and list of frequently asked questions, you will find information on what to do in the days before your surgery as well as what you can expect from us.

    An important reminder: Please complete the first part of your registration, called pre-registration. This will provide Texas Health with information needed to best prepare you for surgery.

     

    Follow this link to pre-register now or call 1-877-773-2368.

     

  • Day of Your Surgery

    Texas Health wants you to feel comfortable and in control on the day of your surgery. Please refer to our surgery checklist, guides and list of frequently asked questions for what to expect. You can also call the hospital or your surgeon with your questions or concerns.

    Arrival and Registration

    Please pre-register before the day of your surgery at Register Me!

    If you register on the day of your surgery, you will need to bring your:

    • Insurance card(s)
    • Photo ID (such as a driver's license)

    Before Surgery

    • After registration, you will be taken to the pre-op room, where a nurse will prepare you for surgery
    • A friend or family member can stay with you in the pre-op room. During your surgery your guest can stay in the waiting room, where they can track your progress
    • When you are in pre-op, your surgeon will visit to answer any additional questions
    • Next, your anesthesiologist will discuss your anesthesia and answer your questions
    • After these interviews, you will be taken to an operating room
  • After Your Surgery

    Post-Op Recovery

    After your surgery, hospital attendants will take you to the recovery room. Your anesthesiologist and nurses will monitor your recovery. Your care team will oversee your vital functions and administer medications to reduce pain, nausea and vomiting, if needed.

    Your Guest

    We will let your family and friends know when your surgery is complete. The surgeon will meet with your designated guest to discuss your condition.

    Your Care

    Before you are discharged, a nurse will review your post-surgical care instructions. You will also be given written care instructions. It is important that you follow them carefully. Before your escort can drive you home, they must discuss and sign your care instructions.

    Your care instructions can include:

    • Incision care
    • Diet and activity
    • Restrictions
    • Medical equipment
    • Medications prescribed
    • Previous medications

    You will be given new prescriptions while in recovery, if needed. These prescriptions may be filled at the pharmacy of your choice. Only your surgeon's office will be able to prescribe refills for these medications.

    Going Home

    You will be discharged when you are in stable condition.

    Only a responsible adult can drive you home. You may also need to arrange for someone to stay with you for the first 24 hours after your return home.

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Pre-Register for Your Upcoming Surgery

We've made it easy and convenient for your upcoming visit to Texas Health. 

 

1-877-773-2368

Your Surgery Checklist
Knowing how to best prepare for surgery can be difficult. This printable checklist covers the do’s and don’ts in the days leading up to surgery.
Surgery Guides
  • Presurgery Preparation

    At least one day before your surgery, a nurse will call to review:

    Arrival Time

    • Medications: your current list and what you can't take the day of surgery
    • Food and drink: times to stop
    • Clothing: what to wear and bring
    • Bathing instructions
    • Lab work that may be needed


    Insurance and Payment

    Before your surgery, the business office will call to review co-pays and deductibles that may be due.

    We will verify your insurance and any amounts that you owe prior to surgery. After surgery, your insurance company will be billed, and you will receive a statement outlining balances from us.

    Texas Health Resources accepts most major insurance companies.

    It is strongly encouraged that you pre-register for your surgery so that you are financially cleared prior to the day of surgery.

    To talk with a financial counselor about your fees or insurance, please call the Patient Access Intake Center at 1-877-773-2368.

    Please note: Your surgeon's office will have a separate fee for their services.

  • Pre-surgery Assessment

    A pre-surgical assessment collects information about your medications and overall health. This information allows the surgical team to prepare for your specific anesthesia and surgical needs. You will be asked to provide:

    • Current medications
    • Health history

    Depending on your surgeon's wishes, you will either go to the hospital for an assessment or the pre-surgery assessment nurse will call you to complete the assessment over the phone. For hospital assessments, please make your appointment at least two days before your surgery. If requested by your surgeon, you will need additional lab tests. Please contact the hospital where you will have your surgery to schedule.

  • Anesthesia

    We want you to feel as comfortable as possible about your upcoming anesthesia and surgery. The information in this guide will help you and your family prepare and know what to expect. Please also talk with your anesthesiologist. Your anesthesiologist will be able to answer questions about your surgery and recovery.

    The anesthesia you will receive during surgery will be either sedation, regional or general.

    Surgery Preparation

    Please see Your Surgery Checklist for information on how to prepare for your anesthesia and surgery.

    Before Surgery Interview

    You and your anesthesiologist will talk about your anesthetic plan and review your health. Generally, this discussion takes place the day of surgery but may happen the day before.

    You and your anesthesiologist will discuss your medical history, lab test results and anesthetic options, risks and benefits. Your anesthetic plan will be based on your overall medical condition, the type of surgery and your choices.

    Your anesthesiologist will also be able to answer questions and discuss concerns about your upcoming surgery. Please contact the hospital if you wish to talk earlier with your anesthesiologist.

    In the Operating Room

    Your anesthesiologist is responsible for managing your anesthetic. As a medical specialist, your anesthesiologist will monitor your heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure, temperature and breathing during surgery. Throughout your surgery, you will be in the care of a member of the anesthesia team.

    Recovery after Surgery

    After surgery, you will be taken to the recovery room. Your anesthesiologist will monitor your vital functions and manage your recovery. You will be given medications to control pain, nausea and vomiting, as needed.

    You will receive instructions on your care and recovery, with a telephone number to call with concerns. In addition, someone from the hospital will call the next day to ask how you are doing and whether you have concerns about your recovery.

  • Adults with Special Needs

    Your loved one who depends on you for their daily care will receive special attention during their surgery.

    In addition to the tips given here, please refer to the Your Surgery Checklist. To prevent a delay or cancellation of the surgery, please follow these guidelines.

    Consents

    On or before the day of surgery, the patient must sign two consents, one for surgery and another for anesthesia. If they are not able, the patient’s legal guardian may sign.

    Registration

    You will need to bring the patient's medication and health history to registration on the day of surgery.

    Personal Attendant

    The legal guardian or another responsible adult will need to be at the hospital, from registration to recovery. Also, a personal attendant must stay with the patient for 24 hours after discharge.

  • Post Op Recovery

    After your surgery, hospital attendants will take you to the recovery room. Your anesthesiologist will monitor your safe recovery and specially trained nurses will ensure your care. Your care team will oversee your vital functions and administer medications to reduce pain, nausea and vomiting, if needed.

    Your Guest

    We will let your family and friends know when your surgery is complete. The surgeon will meet with your designated guest to discuss your condition.

    Your Care

    Before you are discharged, a nurse will review your post-surgical care instructions. You will also be given written care instructions. It is important that you follow them carefully. Before your escort can drive you home, they must discuss and sign your care instructions.

    Your care instructions can include:

    • Incision care
    • Diet and activity
    • Restrictions
    • Medical equipment
    • Medications prescribed
    • Previous medications

    You will be given new prescriptions while in recovery, if needed. These prescriptions may be filled at the pharmacy of your choice. Only your surgeon's office will be able to prescribe refills for these medications.

    Going Home

    You will be discharged when you are in stable condition. Only a responsible adult can drive you home. You will also need to arrange for someone to stay with you for the first 24 hours after your return home.

  • Recovery

    Your recovery at home will probably last a couple of days. Please give your body the time it needs to heal properly and plan to take it easy during that time. In most cases, patients don't want to return to normal activities the day after their surgery.

    The weekday following your surgery, someone from the hospital will call to ask how you are doing and whether you have concerns about your recovery.

    If you feel something unexpected during your recovery, call your surgeon, go to the nearest emergency room or call 911.

    Possible Side Effects

    Usually, side effects from the surgery and anesthesia will gradually go away within a few hours after your surgery. Typical symptoms you may experience include:

    • Headaches
    • Sore throat
    • Muscle aches
    • Mild nausea
    • Sleepiness and dizziness up to 24 hours after surgery


    Caring for Yourself

    How you care for yourself is key to a quick recovery. For the first 24 hours:

    • Do not take nonprescription medication
    • Do not drink alcohol
    • Do not use dangerous machinery (such as a car) while taking pain medication
    • Do not make important decisions
    • Have a caregiver with you the first 24 hours after surgery

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Frequently Asked Questions
  • Should I pre-register for surgery?

    Yes, pre-registration is the first part of registering for your surgery.

    • Online — Pre-Register Now
    • Phone — Call the Patient Access Intake Center at 1-877-773-2368.

  • What should I wear?

    We encourage you to wear comfortable clothing and suggest button-down shirts and blouses. Comfortable shoes are also recommended. Please don't wear jewelry, including body-piercing jewelry. Wear glasses rather than contact lenses, as they will need to be removed before surgery, depending on their type. But if you wear your contacts on the day of your surgery, bring contact solution and a case. Please do not wear makeup or nail polish. They can hide important clinical signs about your health during surgery.

     

  • Will I be sedated before going into the operating room

    Possibly. Each patient's care is personalized, based on their needs.

     

  • How will my guest be kept informed?

    You will be given a tracking number for your friend or family member. This will permit them to track your progress during surgery on our electronic display board.

     

  • Can I bring my cellphone?

    Yes. You and guests can use your cellphones in the lobby only. It is best to leave most valuables and jewelry at home where they are safe. Plan to have a family member keep your cellphone or other small items for you while you are in surgery. 

     

  • Will I be able to smoke?

    No. Please do not smoke or use any tobacco products before your surgery. Please follow your surgeon’s instructions on exactly when to stop smoking. 

     

  • Is it safe to take my daily medication?

    Your physician will decide the best choice for your individual needs. During your pre-admission visit, or a few days before your surgery, a nurse will discuss your medications and other concerns with you. In general, please plan to bring a list of, or all your current medications with you. This should include pills, inhalers, injections (like insulin), and any herbal supplements that you take routinely.  

     

  • Should I take my usual herbal medications?

    We usually ask that you stop taking herbal medications two weeks before your surgery. They can interfere with the clotting of your blood and the anesthetic. 

     

  • Who do I call if I'm not feeling well before my surgery?

    Please call your surgeon immediately if you don't feel well. Also, you can call the hospital during business hours for advice. Details about your possible illness will help us decide whether it may be safer to postpone your surgery. Please don't hesitate to call your surgeon to discuss how you are feeling. 

     

  • I may be pregnant. What should I do?

    Please tell your surgeon as soon as you think that you are pregnant. Surgery for pregnant patients is limited to essential medical procedures only. 

     

  • Can I drive home?

    You must have a responsible adult drive you home. Please arrange to have an adult stay with you for the first 24 hours after surgery, if you are going home the same day.  

     

  • Will I meet my anesthesiologist before surgery?

    Yes. You and your anesthesiologist will talk about your anesthetic plan and review your health. Generally, this discussion takes place the day of surgery but can happen the day before. 

    Please contact the hospital if you wish to talk earlier with your anesthesiologist. 

     

  • Will my special needs be addressed?

    Every effort to accommodate your special needs will be made by the hospital. Please call the hospital before your surgery to discuss how we can make you comfortable during your stay with us. 

     

  • Should I bring my health aids (crutches, hearing aids, etc.)?

    Yes. We encourage you to bring your walker, post-op crutches, hearing aids, etc. 

     

  • What should I remember to do?

    Please bring: 

    • Insurance card(s) 
    • Photo ID (such as a driver's license)

     

    Also, please: 

    • Be sure to pre-register online or by phone before your surgery
    • Wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing
    • Plan a ride home
    • Arrange for your care at home for the first 24 hours
    • Do not wear makeup, nail polish or jewelry (including body jewelry)
    • Leave valuables at home

     

  • What will be done for my pain?

    We take your pain very seriously. Throughout the day, we will monitor your pain levels. We will also assess your pain at home during our post-op call. Based on the results, we will give the medications needed to relieve your pain and make you comfortable. 

    To determine your pain level, we will ask you to rate it using the Visual Analog Pain Scale. For children, we use the Faces Pain Scale. 

    The pain relief medication you get might be oral, intravenous, nerve blocks, local anesthetic shots before and during surgery, etc. 

    Please discuss your pain management with your anesthesiologist and surgeon. They will be able to answer your questions and concerns. 

     

  • Can I request the type of anesthesia used?

    Yes, in some cases. Options are available for a number of types of surgeries. After reviewing your medical history your anesthesiologist will discuss the choices available and your preferences. 

     

  • Are there risks with anesthesia?

    Some type of risk exists with every surgery and anesthetic. The type of surgery and the patient's medical condition are important factors. For healthier patients, the risks of serious complications are rare. 

    You can reduce your risks by following the guidelines in your surgery checklist.

     

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